Understanding Succulent Offsets: What Are They?

Hello everyone, John Horsey here. Today, I’d like to talk about a fascinating aspect of horticulture: succulent offsets. These are the small plants that grow at the base of a mature succulent. Tiger’s Jaws (Faucaria tigrina) and Echeveria elegans are two tender succulents that keep on giving with their offsets. It’s super easy to propagate these plants using them, and I’m going to show you how.

The Role of Offsets in Succulent Propagation

Offsets play a crucial role in succulent propagation. They are essentially baby plants that share a root system with the mother plant. When they reach a certain size, they can be separated and grown into a new plant. This is a natural form of cloning, and it’s one of the reasons why succulents are so easy to propagate.

succulent offsets

Step-by-Step Video Guide: How to Propagate Succulents from Offsets

Our videos below are very similar but it is worth using both as examples of this kind of propagation. We have had a bumper crop of our Echeveria elegans this year only because we had more of them to hand but our Tiger’s Jaws is also coming along nicely and we look forward to putting up the images of the pretty yellow blooms once they have flowered.

  1. 0:32 – Topical Discussion: John Horsey introduces the topic of Echeveria propagation and explains why it’s beneficial.

  2. 1:00 – Practical Begins: John starts the hands-on demonstration of the propagation process, providing step-by-step instructions.

  3. 4:28 – Thank You: John concludes the video, thanks the viewers for watching, and encourages them to explore more videos on his channel.

Here are some key points from the video:

  1. Topical Discussion: John introduces the topic of Faucaria Tigrina propagation and explains why it’s beneficial.
  2. Practical Begins: John demonstrates the propagation process, providing step-by-step instructions.
  3. Thank You: John concludes the video and encourages viewers to explore more videos on his channel.

Caring for Your New Succulent Plants from Offsets

These versatile plants need watering each week during the Summer months, and I have been rotating the pots so they don’t grow stretched. The soil is a lovely well-drained gritty compost, and the offsets have rooted very quickly.

Common Mistakes to Avoid When Propagating Succulents from Offsets

One common mistake when propagating succulents from offsets is overwatering. Succulents are drought-tolerant plants that can quickly rot if they sit in waterlogged soil. Always ensure the soil is well-draining and let it dry out between waterings.

Success Stories: Growing Beautiful Succulents from Offsets

We’ve had great success growing succulents from offsets here at John Horsey Horticulture. Our Echeveria elegans and Tiger’s Jaws are just two examples of the beautiful plants we’ve propagated using this method.

FAQ

What is an offset of a succulent?

An offset of a succulent, also known as a pup or a daughter plant, is a small plant that grows from the base of a mature succulent. It shares the root system with the mother plant and can be separated and grown into a new plant when it's large enough.

How do you plant a succulent offset?

To plant a succulent offset, first carefully remove it from the mother plant, ensuring it has some roots attached. Then, let it dry out for a few days to allow the cut end to callous over. Once it's dried, plant it in well-draining succulent soil and water it lightly. Keep it in a bright location but out of direct sunlight until it's established.

What are plant offsets?

Plant offsets are small plants that grow from the base of a mature plant. They share the root system with the mother plant and can be separated and grown into new plants. Offsets are a natural form of cloning and are a common method of propagation for many types of plants, including succulents.

Should I remove succulent pups?

Yes, you can remove succulent pups or offsets to propagate new plants. However, it's important to wait until the pup is large enough and has its own roots before removing it. Once removed, it can be planted in its own pot and grown into a new succulent plant.

Can you put succulent cuttings straight into soil?

Yes, you can put succulent cuttings straight into soil. However, it's often recommended to let the cut end dry out for a few days to form a callous before planting. This helps to prevent the cutting from absorbing too much water and rotting. Once the cutting has calloused, it can be planted in well-draining succulent soil.

The Benefits of Using Offsets for Succulent Propagation

Using offsets for succulent propagation has many benefits. It’s a quick and easy way to get new plants, it’s cost-effective, and it allows you to clone your favorite succulents.

The Joy of Propagating Succulents from Offsets

Propagating succulents from offsets is a rewarding and enjoyable aspect of horticulture. It allows you to grow your succulent collection and share plants with friends and family. I hope this guide has been helpful and inspires you to try propagating your own succulents from offsets.

Get In Touch

Want to learn more?

Embark on an enriching journey with my Diploma in Horticulture course. It’s entirely online, allowing you to learn at your own pace and in your own time. Don’t miss this opportunity to cultivate your passion for plants and grow your knowledge from the comfort of your own home.